iwiKiwi

A Kiwi in search of her Irish, English & Scottish tribes

Category: Education (Page 1 of 2)

Family History Month 2019

August is Family History Month in New Zealand and Australia, and there’s quite a bit going on for both hardened researchers and those just starting out. Here are a few events happening in the Wellington region and a couple further afield.

City and Harbour, Wellington NZ

City and Harbour, Wellington NZ 4073, from family collection, date unknown

Getting more out of your DNA results
> Saturday 27th July: 10am – 4pm
> Kapiti Community Centre, 15 Ngahina St, Paraparamumu
Just sneaking in at the end of July, a sort of pre-launch for Family History Month, is Kapiti DNA Interest Group’s event with Michelle Patient and Lorna Henderson. All welcome. $15, book by emailing DNADay@KapitiGen.org.

NZSG: Kilbirnie
Talk: Bolton Cemetery and the Motorway with Gabor Toth (Local & NZ History Specialist)
> Thursday 1st August: 10am
> Matairangi Room, ASB Sports Centre, 72 Kemp Street, Kilbirnie, Wellington
All welcome (visitors $2).

Finding Families in New Zealand – Legacy Family Tree Webinar
> Wednesday 7th August: 2pm NZST / 12pm AEST
Too cold to go out? Stay wrapped up warm at home and learn how to use electoral rolls and school records to discover more of your family history, from Kiwi genealogist Fiona Brooker. Free. Register for the webinar

Auckland Family History Expo
> Friday 9th August: 5pm – 8.30pm
> Saturday 10th and Sunday 11th August: 8.30am – 6pm
> Fickling Convention Centre , 546 Mt Albert Rd, Three Kings.
Presenters Nick Barratt (UK) and Cyndi Ingle (USA) are joined by some great speakers from around NZ and Australia, plus there’s also an exhibition with genealogy-related companies and groups. There is a welcome reception and two presentations on the Friday evening ($15 charge). Entry on Saturday and Sunday is free.

NZSG: Porirua
Talk: Using Porirua Library genealogy resources
> Wednesday 14th August: 7.30pm
> Genealogy Section, Porirua Library, entry opposite Harvey Norman Carpark, Wi Neera Drive, Porirua
Bring your laptop and research enquiries. All welcome (visitors $2).

DNA Down Under
> Wednesday 14th – Saturday 31st August
> Brisbane (14th), Perth (17th), Adelaide (20th), Melbourne (23rd), Canberra (26th), Sydney (29th – 31st)
One day events in five cities, plus a three day event in Sydney, featuring genetic genealogist Blaine Bettinger (USA) along with 11 other renowned speakers, with presentations suitable for DNA newbies and gurus alike. $A155 for one day, $A335 for three days, plus discount for combining Sydney with another city. See the DNA Down Under website for venue and programme information. I’m excited to be a DNA Down Under Ambassador and will be attending the Sydney three day event!

NZSG: Hutt Valley
Talk: Sharing her own family history research with Tui Lewis (Hutt City Councillor)
> Thursday 15th August: 7:30pm
> Petone Public Library, 7-11 Britannia Street, Petone
All welcome (visitors gold coin).

Wellington Family History Open Day [PDF, 1.2MB]
> Saturday 24th August: 9.30am – 4pm
> The Hutt Bowling Club, Myrtle St, Lower Hutt
NZSG Combined Wellington Branches event hosted by the Hutt Valley Branch, with  speakers from NZ Society of Genealogists, Wellington City Archives, Digital NZ, Papers Past, Hutt City Libraries, Hutt City Archives, and Archives NZ. Help desks available. $5 entry.

NZSG: Wellington
Talk: Wellington City Archives with Adrian Humphris (Wellington City Archivist)
> Wednesday 28th August: 6pm
> Connolly Hall, Guildford Terrace, Wellington
All welcome (visitors $3).

For other regions in NZ, check out the NZ Society of Genealogists events page for Family History Month activities near you.

 

The Travelling Genie

It’s been over a month since we arrived back from a family trip to the UK, where I managed to squeeze in a few genealogy-related activities.

While our main reason for visiting was to see family and friends, the timing of our visit was so I could attend the award ceremony for my Advanced Diploma in Local History at the beautiful Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford.

University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education, 2019 Award Ceremony at the Sheldonian Theatre

University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education, 2019 Award Ceremony at the Sheldonian Theatre

I would absolutely recommend the course – just be prepared to give up your life while you’re doing it!  There was a lot of reading. And by a lot, I mean A LOT. You’d start off on one book or article and then disappear down a rabbit hole of footnotes and references until your eyes weeped from tiredness. The assignments were evenly spaced throughout the year, though there was also the unit homework to complete as well (did anyone ever finish it all?), and the weekly online tutorial chats to attend. These were relatively informal, but just like with the online course forum, I suffered a little from imposter syndrome and was reticent about posting much.  Which was all very daft, as the students and tutors were welcoming and generous. It was often a struggle fitting in studying with holding down a day job combined with family responsibilities, but oh, the joy in learning and having my eyes opened! And the opportunity to combine my love of history with a love of data wrangling and analysis. It was definitely the most intense and challenging course I have ever undertaken.


After Oxford, it was on to Leicester – where the Guild of One-Name Studies was celebrating its 40th birthday as part of its annual conference, and happily the dates coincided with our travels. The conference organisers had arranged an optional tour of the Richard III visitors’ centre and nearby cathedral, and it was a great chance to peer down into the spot where Richard’s body had been discovered, and also to see his impressive final resting place.

The tomb of Richard III, Leicester Cathedral

The tomb of Richard III, Leicester Cathedral

The conference itself was a combination of socialising and learning, with some fantastic presentations, including one from Simon Wills on ancestral travels by sea, Voyages from the Past. I’ve now since bought his book of the same name. (A fuller review of the conference appears in July’s Guild Journal.)


Before my trip, I had decided I would focus my research on my 3 x great grandfather, John Clark(e), and I spent a couple of days at The National Archives at Kew and three days in Belfast, chasing him up in muster rolls, pension payment records, and parish registers.  Which John Clark was he – Thing 1 or Thing 2??

John Clark (1) and (2) in the muster rolls for 74th Regiment of Foot

John Clark (1) and (2), 74th Regiment of Foot muster roll, 1 Jul – 30 Sep 1846, WO 12/8099, National Archives (UK)

I had been to Belfast several times before, but never visited the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI). On my first morning in the city I stopped in at the Ulster Historical Foundation to see about booking a research consultation. Fortunately there was a researcher available right then and there, and Gillian Hunt was a huge help in reviewing what I’d already found and suggesting ways forward in my research, as well as finding a baptism I hadn’t come across.  I’d really recommend doing this, especially if it’s your first time in Belfast, though at busier times you’d need to book an appointment in advance.

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI), Belfast

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI), Belfast

The facilities at PRONI are fabulous and the staff incredibly helpful.  It’s located in the Titanic Quarter, not far from the Titanic museum, and I opted to stay in the city centre, about a 30 minute walk away. The Hop-on Hop-off City Sightseeing bus travels through the area regularly, and on my last afternoon I hopped on and took a tour around the city before heading to the airport.


The last genealogical event I attended was Family Tree LIVE at Alexandra Palace in London at the end of April.  After a dearth of similar events last year due to the closure of WDYTYA? Live, suddenly there’s a whole heap of genie treats this year, and I was thrilled to sneak this in to our trip.

Queuing up to get in to Family Tree Live, Alexandra Palace, London

Family Tree LIVE, Alexandra Palace, London

The venue was fantastic, and although there were few nearby eating and sleeping options, there was parking available plus shuttle buses from Wood Green underground station.  I thought the atmosphere was wonderful, and it was lovely to catch up with many genie friends and put faces to Twitter handles. The range of talks was excellent – highlights for me were Pam Smith’s presentation on her one-place study of Rillington, and Jonny Perl’s chromosome mapping with his DNA Painter tool.


Back on this side of the planet now and there’s lots to look forward to!  My father is celebrating his 80th birthday and the launch of his family history book this month. August is Family History month in Australasia, and I’m heading to Auckland for the Family History Expo there, and have also booked for the DNA Down Under three day event in Sydney at the end of August.

RootsTech 2018 ~ livestreaming from Salt Lake City, Utah

RootsTech is the annual genealogy-meets-technology conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, and this year is being held Wednesday 28th February to Saturday 3rd March. Not all of us can make it over there in person, but we can watch some of the presentations at home. Inspired by Sylvia Valentine who has “translated” the timetable from MST (Mountain Standard Time) into GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) for UK and Ireland folks, below is the timetable in NZDT (New Zealand Daylight Time). New Zealand is 20 hours ahead of Salt Lake City, so don’t get confused by the “Wednesday General Session” happening on a Thursday, etc!

There’s an excellent line-up of speakers, and if you have British Isles ancestry I can definitely recommend Myko Clelland and Brian Donovan – I’ve heard them both speak in person and they’re bound to give engaging and informative presentations.

For more details on the presentations and the live stream, visit the RootsTech website.

Alarm clocks at the ready!

Thursday, 1st March
4:30am Family History in 5 Minutes a Day Deborah Gamble
7:00am DNA—One Family, One World David Nicholson
9:30am Organizing and Preserving Photograph Collections Ari Wilkins
11:00am Finding the Answers: The Basics of WWII Research Jennifer Holik
12:30pm Wednesday General Session and Innovation Showcase Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch International
Friday, 2nd March
4:30am Thursday General Session Brandon Stanton, founder of Humans of New York
7:00am MyHeritage DNA 101: From Test to Results Yaniv Erlich
9:30am Google Photos: Collect, Organize, Preserve, and Share Michelle Goodrum
11:00am Unlocking Roman Catholic Records Brian Donovan
12:30pm A Gift of Life: Who’s Writing Your Story? Deborah Abbott
Saturday, 3rd March
4:30am Friday General Session Scott Hamilton
7:00am findmypast’s British and Irish Hidden Gems Myko Clelland
9:30am Finding the Right DNA Test for You Jim Brewster
11:00am How Not to Leave Your Genealogy Behind Amy Johnson Crow and Curt Witcher
12:30pm Finding Elusive Records at FamilySearch Robert Kehrer
Sunday, 4th March
4:30am Saturday General Session Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Natalia Lafourcade
7:00am Civil Registration Indexes of England and Wales Audrey Collins
9:30am Advancing Your Genealogy Research with DNA Anna Swayne
11:00am Pain in the Access: More Web for Your Genealogy Curt Witcher

The Next Stage ~ GOONS seminar

Alas, my poor neglected blog! I have been racing around the last few months doing all manner of research, attending seminars and tutorials, and yes, even writing and submitting some IHGS assignments. Sadly, this has left little time for posting.

But today I was reminded how much I missed blogging, when I met one of my geneablogging heroes, GeniAus (aka Jill Ball), at a Guild of One-Name Studies event in Burgess Hill, West Sussex.

The Next Stage GOONS seminar (image: Alan Moorhouse)

The Next Stage GOONS seminar (image: Alan Moorhouse)

The seminar was entitled “The Next Stage” and the presentations were focused on taking your one-name study past the data collection stage to the analysis and publishing stages. I haven’t registered a surname with the Guild yet, but I have two in mind – for when I get a bit of spare time. So I’m still in the ‘information-gathering’ stage.

You can check out the full programme on the Guild website, and there will be videos of all presentations available online soon for Guild members. I found Sherry Irvine’s talk Context and Your Study: Threads of Reference very thought-provoking, and Dr Eilidh Garrett’s How can Demography Help your Study? presentation made me want to be a demographer! It’s perhaps a bit unfair to single those two out, as all the talks were very good. Overall, a great day and well-organised.

The Guild’s next seminar is to be held in London on 7 February 2015 and is all about Medical and Healthcare records. You don’t have to be a member to attend. And who knows who you might bump into there!

My Genealogy Year 2012 : Accentuate the Positive!

Jill from Geniaus came up with a wonderful idea to celebrate the high points of 2012:  Accentuate the Positive 2012 Geneameme, rather than concentrate on what we didn’t achieve during the year. So instead of feeling a bit depressed over all the things I didn’t quite manage to do this year, I get to feel a whole heap happier about all the cool stuff that happened!

An elusive ancestor I found was James Florey. Well, he’s not actually an ancestor, which I suspected but can now prove. He was the first husband of my 4 x great grandmother, Elizabeth Knott, and I couldn’t figure out what happened to him – it was as if he had abandoned his family and disappeared off the face of the earth. He hadn’t – he got transported to Australia for 10 years for sheep-stealing. Meanwhile, his wife found comfort in another’s arms, gave birth to my 3 x great grandfather (Henry Richard Florey/Pope), and eventually remarried. I have yet to find out what happened to James after he gained his Certificate of Freedom. Did he return to England, or stay in Australia?

A precious family photo I found was one that may be of my Nanna, Jean McGonnell, when she was young.

Possibly Myrtle Jean Louisa McGonnell (1915-2011)

Possibly Myrtle Jean Louisa McGonnell (1915-2011)

An ancestor’s grave I found was my great grandparents and grandparents’ final resting place in Bromley Cemetery, Christchurch, NZ – thankfully with little damage from the earthquakes in 2011.

A newly found family member who shared a photo of my 3 x great grandfather (the previously mentioned Henry Richard Florey) and his family – I could finally put a face to the ancestor who has led me a merry dance through all sorts of records.  Then, the wife of a fourth cousin sent me a family history of “our” Brosnahan family – amazing! And yet more family members contacted me with stories and photos, either through this blog or via my tree on Ancestry.

My 2012 blog post that I was particularly proud of was.. all the ones in February – I blogged every day that month.

My 2012 blog post that received a large number of hits or comments was difficult to work out as my Stats plugin fell over and won’t play nice, but I think  it was my post on James Brosnan’s will.

A social media tool I enjoyed using for genealogy was Twitter. I love keeping up to date with genealogy news, and also with fellow IHGS students.  I also joined a couple of groups on Facebook, and a Google+ community, and will see how those pan out over the next year.

A genealogy conference/seminar/webinar from which I learnt something new was all of them! I had a busy year starting with WDYTYA? Live in February, then several weekend seminars at IHGS later in the year, and finally Celia Heritage’s one day workshop on Fleshing out Your Family Tree. I think the one where I learnt the most was the Military Records seminar at IHGS, given by Les Mitchinson, as this was an area I wasn’t familiar with.

A genealogy book that taught me something new was Helen Osborn’s Genealogy: Essential Research Methods.

A great repository/archive/library I visited was the Perth and Kinross Council Archive in the A K Bell Library in Perth, Scotland. I didn’t have much time there, unfortunately, but enough to find the burial records for my 3 x great grandparents, Michael Burke and Bridget Flynn, and take a quick look at some of the Perth valuation rolls.

 A new genealogy/history book I enjoyed was Ciarán Ó Murchadha’s The Great Famine : Ireland’s Agony 1845-1852.

It was exciting to finally meet my IHGS tutor, Celia Heritage! Plus twitter pals and fellow IHGS students at Canterbury in October, and also my Temuka cousins at the beginning of the year in New Zealand.

A geneadventure I enjoyed was my trip to Temuka in January, meeting cousins and visiting the family farm, and places where my grandfather grew up in South Canterbury. Also the trip to Scotland in May to visit the areas connected with my Burke and Philp ancestors. And visiting Deptford, London, with my mother to see where her grandfather was born and raised.

Another positive I would like to share is I finally indexed my research notebooks! And it has already proven to be a worthwhile exercise.  Who knows, maybe this year the data may find its way into Reunion?  I also worked on my IHGS assignments, submitting two batches this year, and received some not-too-shabby marks in return.

Thanks to Jill for a great opportunity to share my year of family history research!  You can read about the 2012 highlights of other geneabloggers through her Geniaus website.

 

Task list ~ Sorting Saturday

Well, we’re over halfway through December already and I haven’t even thought about a task list for the month!   So much for being more organised…

Anyway, a quick look at how I did on my November tasks:

  • outstanding emails    –  half done, need to finish the rest before Christmas
  • lecture 3 assignments   –   a miracle indeed, finished and submitted!!  Have even started on lecture 4 assignments
  • regular blogging (including finishing my West Yorkshire research trip series)    –   not done so well here, though completed my West Yorkshire posts
  • filing and inputting data for maternal side   –    ummm…
  • book tickets for WDYTYA? Live in February  –   yup indeedy, tickets bought and workshops booked.  Even have hotel booked, woohoo!

I also fitted in a day course at IHGS on The Parish and the Manor, and a day’s research up in Suffolk on the Wright side of my family.

The rest of this month will kinda be taken up with Christmas activities, but I’m also hoping to:

  • complete two lecture 4 assignments
  • undertake more Wright research up in Suffolk
  • do some prep work for my New Zealand trip in January
  • maybe some filing…?? ho ho ho

Sorting Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

November task list ~ Sorting Saturday

I am still behind in all my filing and sorting and such like, and not much, if any, progess has been made since September.

Happily though, my grandfather’s biography is finished.  Shrieks of joy and jubilation! Two weeks ago I finally submitted my Lecture 2 assignments for the course I’m doing with IHGS.  It’s taken me a year to do the first two lectures, and I have 22 more to go…. I think I may need to speed up a little.

I’m hoping a task list might help me get focussed over the next month.  There are six more weeks before the kids break up for Christmas, so I have to make the most of my kid-free time. These are my  priorities for November:

  • outstanding emails
  • lecture 3 assignments
  • regular blogging (including finishing my West Yorkshire research trip series)
  • filing and inputting data for maternal side
  • book tickets for WDYTYA? Live in February

Sorting Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Celebrating the Census at the National Archives, Kew

So much for getting back to blogging regularly, I keep getting distracted by other tasks.  One of the more pleasant ones was attending the Celebrating the Census conference at the National Archives on Saturday.

It was an all day event with two streams of presentations.  Of course, there’s always a session or two where I’m torn between two different lectures!

The ones I enjoyed the most were Sharon Hintze from Family  Search giving an entertaining overview of worldwide census returns, and Helen Kelly on Irish census returns and census substitutes that made me much more optimistic about finding my Irish folk. (And that the most important thing is not trying to trace your family back to the mists of time, but actually finding the place, the land where your ancestors trod.)

Dee Williams from ScotlandsPeople gave a great background of, and searching tips for, the Scottish censuses, and TNA’s Mark Pearsall highlighted their pre-1841 censuses and listings.  Humphrey Southall (University of Portsmouth) gave a geographer’s view of the censuses and showed us their wonderful website of historic geographical information, A Vision of Britain through Time: “A vision of Britain between 1801 and 2001. Including maps, statistical trends and historical descriptions.”  Go check it out.

One of the nice things about events like this, is that you get to meet like-minded people.   Thanks to everyone at TNA for a fantastic day!

Hitting the books ~ Sorting Saturday

I had a couple of kid-free hours today, so I could tackle some assignment work.  This current block of assignments are all focussed on family records, and I’m currently drafting an appraisal of the records I have in my possession, and how they’ve helped (or hindered) me in my research.  I also did a little work on the third assignment – my grandfather’s biography – adding some more information to the timeline I’ve created, and making notes where more research is required.  I need to incorporate significant historical events into the biography, and found some great timelines for New Zealand history online.  Hopefully I may also be able to source some New Zealand history books through my local library, otherwise I’m kinda relying on the internet.

I had great plans to do more organising of my Stuff today, but that fell by the wayside.  I’m motivated more to start planning a research trip to Yorkshire in the summer.  With three young kids in tow, it will be “interesting”.

On Monday, I’m hoping to visit the London Family History Centre if I can get myself sorted with a research plan before then.   It requires a bit of a search through their catalogue to see what records they have that might be useful – I know they have Casey’s O’Kief, Coshe Mange, Slieve Lougher and Upper Blackwater in Ireland on microfilm, for example, which may help me greatly with my Co. Kerry ancestors.

Stuff and censuses ~ Sorting Saturday

Some of the blog posts I’ve been reading lately have inspired me to start tackling some of my stuff that’s Not Been Dealt With. For instance, while writing yesterday’s post I realised most of the census records I have collected are just images on my computer, a few have been transcribed, none have been printed out, and only a couple have made it into my Reunion family file.

What to do? I wonder what everyone else does?

This afternoon I have been printing off census images, then transcribing the information onto blank UK census sheets from Ancestry. I’ve also noted down any extra citation information like date accessed and GSU roll. Once done, I place both pages back to back in a clear punch pocket and file away in my surname ring binders. This is going to take some time, but I figure if I do a bit every Saturday, it’ll get completed eventually. And then there’s adding all the information into Reunion as well, which I probably need to do as I go, or it will become a nightmare job!

Two books I had requested from the library turned up this week – more background reading for my course work: The Female Line – Researching your Female Ancestors by Margaret Ward, and Family Photographs & How to Date Them by Jayne Shrimpton. I met Jayne at Who Do You Think You Are? Live back in February and she dated a photograph for me, so I’m looking forward to reading about how she does it.

And in other news, I passed my first two assignments! (I’m studying towards the Higher Certificate in Genealogy with the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies). I received a B+ for my autobiography and an A- for my Seize Quartiers (drop-line pedigree chart up to my 16 great great grandparents). It was great to get the comments back before I finish my next lot of assignments. I’m currently working on my paternal grandfather’s biography, need to get cracking on that.

Sorting Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

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